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Renal Failure And Diagnosis

The acute and chronic kidney diseases, arterial hypertension and diabetes, as well as the prolonged use of certain medications and intoxication by some heavy metals, can irreversibly damage the kidneys and lead to a ' renal insufficiency. Any significant kidney damage that lasts more than three months and does not recede with the treatment can be considered chronic, therefore, what we call chronic renal failure is the effect of a progressive and slow decline in the ability of the kidneys to filter the blood and purify it from the waste products of the body's metabolism, especially that of protein substances.

Causes of Renal Failure

Among the causes of renal failure, the most serious are currently diabetes and arterial hypertension because, if not properly controlled, they cause a rapid decrease in renal function.  But they are not the only ones. Among the causes of chronic kidney disease that can lead to kidney failure, we also find:

  • The glomerulonephritis and acute and conical pyelonephritis - inflammation of the small renal blood vessels (glomeruli) and the small tubes (tubules) through which the urine passes to be eliminated
  • Obstruction of the urinary tract often with pyelonephritis, or a strong inflammation that involves all the urinary tract and the kidney itself
  • Autoimmune diseases (such as systemic lupus erythematosus), in which antirene antibodies irreversibly damage the organ
  • Some renal anomalies such as the presence of polycystic kidney disease.

As a result of these diseases there is an accumulation of waste substances or waste from the metabolism which lead first to the increase in the concentration of nitrogen (azotemia) and other substances in the blood, compromising its optimal balance and making it more acidic. This causes numerous other ailments that we will now see.

The blood and urine tests are essential to confirm the presence of poor renal function." In particular, for the complete diagnosis of renal insufficiency we perform:

Blood and urinary tests

Renal ultrasound test

Possible renal biopsy, KFT (Kidney function test), or the removal of a tissue sample from a kidney for examination (it could be the most accurate test, but it is not advisable if the results of an ultrasound examination show that the kidneys are small and with scars).

Urinalysis can detect the presence of proteins, abnormal cells and other problems. Azotaemia and above all, creatininemia (which analysescreatine, a substance contained in the muscles, present in the blood) are the best indicators for assessing the degree of renal failure (based on renal filtration capacity). Furthermore, there may be other blood changes- such as increased potassium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone in the blood, decrease in calcium, calcitriol and vitamin.

The ultrasound, which is done to exclude an obstruction or abnormality of the urinary tract and to verify the size of the kidneys, shows, in chronic renal insufficiency, the shrinking and irregularity of the kidney.

Having identified symptoms and diagnoses of chronic renal failure, we now want to understand what the consequences for the body are.

Kidney Function Test- When You Should Go For It!

Kidneys are fragile like other parts of the body. Due to their worsening the body's anatomy deteriorates, therefore it is necessary to take special care of them. By adopting many small things, kidney disease can be avoided. As the world progresses, as the number of people suffering from kidney disease is increasing in the country. How many people are suffering from this disease in our country can be judged naturally.

To know the state of kidney function, a set of biochemical tests are made from blood and urine samples collected during 24 hours, together with the observation of the urinary sediment under a microscope.

These tests help the doctor to focus well on the diagnosis and treatment of a disease.

For the correct sampling of urine for 24 hours, the first urination should be discarded at 08:00 hours, collecting all urine for the next 24 hours in a suitable sterile container, which can be supplied by the hospital or purchased from a drugstore.

How Can I Know If I Have Kidney Disease?

In general, kidney disease in its initial stage has no symptoms. The only way to know how well your kidneys are working is to undergo tests. Have a checkup of kidney disease if you suffer from:

  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease

The Family History of Kidney Failure

If you have diabetes, get a checkup every year. If you feel pain from high blood pressure, heart disease or have a family history of kidney failure, talk with your doctor about how often you should have it evaluated. The sooner you know you have kidney disease, the sooner you can get treatment to help protect your kidneys.

How Is Kidney Function Test Done?

The KFT testis a standard blood-based test. It contains several parameters that show the health of the kidneys. The Kidney Function Test Report includes the typical limitations of kidney parameters. A phlebotomist or a technician will take a blood sample from you for this test. It can also be arranged for collection from home. The result comes within 24 hours.

How Is Kidney Function Test Done?

The Kidney Function Test is a standard blood-based test. It contains several parameters that show the health of the kidneys. The Kidney Function Test Report includes the typical limitations of kidney parameters. A phlebotomist or a technician will take a blood sample from you for this test. It can also be arranged for collection from home. The result comes within 24 hours.

What Is Done During The Kidney Function Test?

During the kidney function test, technicians remove blood samples from the patient's body; in the process, bandage or elastic bands are banded on the upper side of the patient. After that where the injection needle is to be applied, the place is cleaned by antiseptic, and after that, the needle is inserted in the vein from the inside of the skin. After this, a sampling of blood is taken through the needle, which is stored in the syringe, vial or tube attached to the needle and taken to the laboratory for its analysis. When a needle is applied, it may feel a little prick or pain. After the needle is removed, the doctor places cotton wool on it or puts the bandage to prevent it from bleeding. A needle spot may have blue marks for a few days, although it does not cause severe and chronic pain.

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